Diane Gamboa

I have been creating visual work since early childhood, having my first exhibit at age five. The work has always been figurative with the exception of a few flower works. Being self taught has allowed me the ability to be versatile without institutional interruption. I have been exhibiting professionally since the 1970s, drawing from personal experiences.

In the 1980s, Los Angeles was energized by many alternative locations for self expression. From 1980 to 1984, I used black and white photography to document the Bad Influence series of Rock (punk) bands from East L.A. along with other bands of the time. Music, art, and performance was and is a natural combination. Between 1980 and 1987, I was a member of ASCO, a conceptual multi-media performance art group. I served as consultant, stylist, and referee.

I create numerous site-specific Hit and Run paper fashion live presentations. The concept was to juxtapose highly distinctive disposable paper sculpture on non-traditional models. The urban landscape served as the perfect environment for the Hit and Run presentations. The events would run from five to thirty minutes or even hours depending on the situation. In 1989 a large gathering formed like an instant street party. Another event became instantly dangerous when I picked the wrong street at the wrong time. The paper fashions became quite popular, ending up in museums and in the hands of closet dressers. They are created to be disposable like mass-consumed junk.

The evolution of the work has involved various transformations in medium, approach, and scale. In the 1990s, I found myself using the tension and stress involved in the urban environment to create new works. The decade was used for refinement in concept and artistic skills.

In 1997, I started the Pin Up series of 366 ink drawings on vellum. The images are of the male as subject. The ongoing series is an in-depth study of interpersonal relationships between women and men. The Pin Up and Pin Down images take place in interior settings with a strong personal touch of pattern and design.

The Pin Up works have inspired the most recent Endangered Species series. Unlike the disposable paper fashions, the current work is intended to be very permanent. In plans to create/recreate some of the Pin Up drawings in a three-dimensional form, the development of additional skills are needed. Many of the figures in the drawings are covered in tattoos. I am currently working in the medium of tattooing (ink on flesh). Other mediums include glass (stained glass windows), metal, concrete, etc. to create my visions.

This transparent individuals exhibition was selected from the ongoing Pin Up series of 366 drawings. Each drawing is on an 8-1/2 x 11 inch surface using alva-line 16 lb., 100 percent cotton fiber vellum. Black waterproof India ink is applied with a brush and rapidograph technical pens. The works exhibited are reproductions of the original on Apollo premium quality transparency film.

Obviously the images are of the male as subject from a female perspective. The series is an in-depth study of interpersonal relationships between women and men. The ongoing analysis of the opposite sex and the self-analysis is endless. At times I can be completely intoxicated by the male and at other times I find the male repulsive. One way or the other I am fascinated.

Why and when does power and control come into play? Who has the upper hand and who gets the back hand? When is it love, when is it just sex, and when does it become major mind-fucking? Who is looking for a serious relationship? When is it a sick obsession? Have you ever been mad in love or crazy without it? Who has high voltage emotions and who is overwhelmed with the fear of it all? The questions are endless and timeless.

The Pin Up and Pin Down images take place in interior settings with a strong personal touch of pattern and design. The subjects are no slaves of fashion but are devotees of high style.
It is a pleasure to be showing at Deep River.